Library News

Reading Recommendations for National Hispanic Heritage Month

Bienvenidos a Northeastern, and happy Hispanic Heritage Month! Initially recognized as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson in 1968, the celebration of Hispanic American history was expanded to a month-long event in 1988 by President Ronald Reagan, and is observed from September 15-October 15 each year. Here at the Northeastern University Library, we’ve curated a selection of recreational reading that highlights Hispanic voices, stories, and culture.

Visit the Hub on the first floor of Snell Library to check out the print collection, which includes titles in both English and Spanish. If you’re not on the Boston campus, enjoy any of the e-books or audiobooks linked from our virtual bookshelf! Here are some recommended reads:

The cover of The Hacienda by Isabel Cañas

The Hacienda by Isabel Cañas (2022)

This Gothic fairytale begins in the years following the Mexican War of Independence. Beatriz, left orphaned and homeless by the war, marries a wealthy widower and moves to his secluded country estate. But as she settles into her new home, Beatriz begins to hear voices and see visions, and to wonder what really happened to her husband’s first wife.

The cover of Violeta by Isabel Allende

Violeta by Isabel Allende (2022)

The newest novel from the award-winning author of The House of the Spirits and Zorro (among many others!) follows the momentous hundred-year life of Violeta Del Valle, from her birth in 1920 until her death a century later.



The cover of Spirit Run: A 6,000-Mile Marathon Through America's Stolen Land by Noé Álvarez

Spirit Run: A 6,000-Mile Marathon Through America’s Stolen Land by Noé Álvarez (2020)

The son of Mexican immigrants living in Washington, Noé Álvarez left college to participate in the Peace and Dignity Journey: a months-long run organized every four years by Indigenous and First Nations communities, with the intention of fostering and reaffirming cultural connections among First Nations peoples.

Recreational Reads Available Through New OverDrive Subscription

Looking for your next great read? Northeastern University Library is proud to announce our new OverDrive platform, which offers a dynamic collection of e-books and audiobooks to all members of the Northeastern community. Enjoy curated selections of new fiction, popular nonfiction, classic works, and audiobooks.

You can explore the full OverDrive collection at northeasternuni.overdrive.com. We’re adding new materials all the time, so be sure to check back frequently! Northeastern’s OverDrive platform connects seamlessly to the free Libby app for iOS and Android, which allows you to place holds, check out books, and read or listen on your tablet or smartphone. If you’re a member of a public library that supports Libby, you can quickly switch between library accounts to maximize your reading experience.

E-books and audiobooks in the OverDrive collection are also linked directly from Scholar OneSearch, our library catalog, so you can do all your searching in one place!

Users are currently able to check out three titles at a time for up to two weeks, and can place a maximum of three simultaneous holds. When accessing materials on OverDrive, you’ll be prompted to log in with your Northeastern/Mills or NCH London credentials.

Northeastern’s OverDrive instance replaces our previous membership to the SAILS OverDrive platform, and allows Northeastern librarians greater control over the materials in the collection. This means that we’re able to respond to your requests! If there’s something you’d like to see in the library’s collection, just fill out the Recommend a Purchase form to let us know.

Here are some recommended reads to help you get started…

The cover of the book Persuasion by Jane Austen


Persuasion: The recent Netflix adaptation of this Jane Austen novel may have been a bit of a flop, but the original story is a classic for a reason. Austen’s final work is a romantic meditation on love and duty.




The cover of Book Lovers by Emily Henry



Book Lovers: This New York Times bestseller is a love letter to books and reading, and a romance between two very different—but maybe not so different?—readers.




The cover of Between Two Kingdoms by Suleika Jaouad

Between Two Kingdoms: At twenty two, Suleika Jaouad has just graduated from college and has her whole life ahead of her. Then, without warning, she’s diagnosed with leukemia. But this is not a book about surviving cancer. It’s a book about what comes after: learning to live in the world again.

Library Welcomes New First-Year Experience Librarians

Rachel Landis and Tamara Uhaze

This spring the Library welcomed First Year Experience Librarians Rachel Landis and Tamara Uhaze. Their goal is to help new Northeastern students with their transition to college research. They also plan events for first-year students to network with one another and familiarize themselves with the library and all it has to offer. Some events they are planning for this fall include a movie screening and trivia night. Keep an eye out for them on the library calendar!

Rachel graduated with her MLIS from Drexel University and previously worked in the libraries at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Virginia. In her free time, you’ll find Rachel reading thrillers, trying new restaurants around Boston, or hanging out with her two-year-old Beagle-mix, Leo. Tamara received her MLS from Texas Woman’s University and previously worked at The College of New Jersey as a librarian.  Tamara spends her time gardening, watching the latest movies, and checking out the museums in Boston.

Be sure to find the library’s table at Fall Fest on Tuesday September 6th. Rachel and Tamara will be there to answer your questions about the library and to facilitate a fun game where you have the chance to win a gift card. During Welcome Week, the library is also offering tours on Wednesday September 7th and Thursday September 8th departing at 1 and 1:30 p.m. from the lobby of Snell Library. 

Library Adds New York Times, Financial Times to Growing Online Newspaper Collection

The Northeastern University Library is very pleased to announce that the New York Times and Financial Times are now available to the Northeastern community through their publishers’ websites.

The New York Times is America’s most influential newspaper. In addition to daily news from the city of New York, it is best known for its extensive political coverage of the United States, international news, and in-depth focus on books, arts, and culture.

Northeastern’s subscription includes all the newspaper’s journalism, from today’s breaking news to full archival coverage (with digital images of the newspaper) back to 1980. Users can read and participate in comments, view data visualizations, and access video journalism and podcasts. To read on your phone, use the New York Times app on Apple or Google Play. Up to 10 articles per month can be shared gratis with non-subscribers.

Individual registration with your Northeastern (or New College of the Humanities-London) email is required. Current Northeastern faculty, staff, and students are eligible for access. Learn more and register for the New York Times.

The Financial Times is London-based and is also international in scope. From its roots as a business newspaper, it has grown to include political, economic, and cultural news. Northeastern’s subscription includes both the International and UK editions. The Financial Times tracks global markets, offers extensive coverage of business management and marketing news and trends worldwide, and hosts subject-focused newsletters, podcasts, and live conferences.

For classroom use, instructors can easily create reading lists to share with students. In addition, up to 20 “gift articles” per month can be shared with non-subscribers. A Financial Times app is available on Apple and Google Play.

Individual registration with your Northeastern (or New College of the Humanities-London) email is required. Current Northeastern faculty, staff, and students are eligible for access. Learn more and register for the Financial Times.

These two news sites join the hundreds of daily newspapers from Access World News and PressReader, as well as the Economist, the Wall Street Journal, Foreign Policy, and more, in the library’s growing collection of news sources from around the world. These highly requested newspapers meet the information needs of an increasingly global Northeastern.

Learn more about accessing newspapers through the Northeastern University Library on our News and Newspapers Guide.

This post was written with Roxanne Palmatier, Christine Oka, and Brooke Williams.

New Librarian Dedicated to Improving Library Accessibility

A smiling person with long brown hair and glasses wearing a white button-down shirt and a dress with avocado cats stands outside.

Hello! I’m Anaya Jones and I’m very excited to join Northeastern University as the Accessibility & Online Learning Librarian.

I became interested in scalable information literacy instruction at Mary Baldwin University. Building on that knowledge, I joined Southern New Hampshire University. Here at Northeastern, I’m joining an established team of online learning librarians who support students around the world. Depending on where you are and what you’re studying, you just might see me in a workshop, a research guide, or in your Canvas course.

A big part of my personal philosophy is that accessibility plays an integral role in librarianship and education. Our world is largely designed for non-disabled people, and this creates barriers for folks with disabilities. Access to information and services are at the core of the work librarians do in a wide range of roles and contexts. It’s important to me that our dedication to access extends to accessibility. Contributing to an accessible world is the ethical thing to do — but accessibility doesn’t happen accidentally. I’m at the Northeastern University Library to collaboratively remove accessibility barriers.

Everyone shares the responsibility to increase accessibility. Think about the things you can do to make your corner of the world more accessible:

  • Use Microsoft’s Accessibility Checker in Outlook, Word, and PowerPoint
  • Make your social media posts accessible by:
    • including alt-text for images
    • avoiding overusing emojis, symbols, or capitalized letters
    • use CamelCase for hashtags
    • edit auto-generated alt-text and captions
    • use inclusive language and gender-neutral pronouns
  • When working on new projects, ask about access for people with disabilities. How does your app work with a screen reader? Can you navigate that website with a keyboard? How will a person in a wheelchair access that new building? You don’t have to know everything to ask good questions.
Two adorable brown, white, and black dogs sit together in a blue chair, looking ready for you to pet them
Mordecai and Moxxi

This isn’t all there is to increasing accessibility, but it will help! If you experience barriers with Northeastern University Library resources or tools, let us know using the Report a Problem form.

Thanks for reading this far! I hail from Southern California and also lived in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley for 10 years. I earned my Master of Library and Information Science degree from Drexel University. Last year, I earned my International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) Certified Professional in Accessibility Core Competencies (CPACC) certification. I spend all my free time thinking about and petting my ridiculously adorable dogs Mordecai and Moxxi.