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Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive – WBUR Oral History Project Announces Lesson Plans

In the wake of the events that occurred on April 15, 2013 at the 117th Boston Marathon and on April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Northeastern University English Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon and Assistant Professor Ryan Cordell recognized the obvious need for a space where people could tell and share their stories with each other.  They believed that sharing stories from survivors, families, witnesses, visitors to the city, and everyone around the world touched by the event will speed the healing process, and wanted to create that space as a gift to the community. Together, they established the Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive, a crowd-sourced, digital archive of pictures, videos, stories, and social media related to the Boston Marathon bombing.  Thus far, they have acquired an archive of almost 10,000 items, 3 interactive exhibits, and 3 major collections.

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[April 21, 2013, from the Public Submissions collection]

This summer, I contributed to this remarkable endeavor as a Simmons School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) graduate summer intern sponsored by the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Department and supported by the Project Co-Director James McGrath. In addition to exhibit building and social media, the main task of my internship was to create lesson plans for schoolroom use. Because children were affected by this crisis as well, the team at Our Marathon thought it would help the healing process for children to use the Our Marathon archives—to remember and share stories in the safety of their own classrooms.  Additionally, it can be difficult for teachers to navigate the complex questions young students ask and a resource like the digital archive can work as a great tool to facilitate age appropriate discussion. To that end, I helped create a Teaching Resources page for Our Marathon. This page showcases five lesson plans for Kindergarten through Grade 12 that utilize Letters to the City of Boston and The Copley Square Memorial collections,  and the WBUR Oral History Project as the basis for a teaching unit. These lesson plans are designed to demonstrate mastery of grade and subject appropriate Common Core Standards. Hopefully, these assignments will generate more student submissions to the archive as well as create a platform for an important dialogue amongst students and teachers. I look forward to reading about their experiences in the Our Marathon archives.

Meet the Author: Dr. Emily Fox-Kales!

On Wednesday, November 16, 2011 at 12PM in 90 Snell, Northeastern University Libraries will hold another one of its unique and enlightening Meet the Author events. Come hear author and Northeastern professor, Dr. Emily Fox-Kales, talk about her latest book, Body Shots. Body Shots exposes the scandalous yet disturbing standards centered around Hollywood and the repeating message that thin is beautiful. In her research, Dr. Fox-Kales explores how Hollywood uses films, celebrities, and social media in order to propagate obsessive weight control, self-scrutiny and vigilance, and excessive exercise. By utilizing her studies of psychology, cinema analysis, and gender studies, Dr. Fox-Kales analyzes these Hollywood values and how it unfortunately has become the norm in today's society to obsess over weight and eating habits. During the Meet the Author event, Dr. Fox-Kales will discuss her new novel in further detail and also sign books following the talk. Books will be available for purchase at a discounted rate and provided by the NU Bookstore. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information about our Meet the Author series and other related programs, click here!

Test-Drive the Chicago Manual of Style Online!

Many of us are familiar with the Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) and use it as a reference while writing. Now Snell Library is providing online access to the CMOS's 15th and 16th editions in one easy location. New online-only features include:
  • Being able to search the CMOS and specify either the 15th or 16th edition
  • A Q&A section that answers those tricky questions as submitted by users -- including a place to submit your own questions
The 16th edition, published in 2010, is updated for the digital age. All of us have run across one of those pesky hard-to-answer citation questions. "How do I reference a Twitter post? What about a blog entry? Or a podcast?" For those of you who are editors or writers, there is now an electronic editing checklist to help you in your online editing ventures. Don’t forget to check out Northeastern University Libraries' access to the AMA Manual of Style, and here is a general guide to MLA, APA, Chicago, and CSE styles.

Blue and Green Line Passengers: Can You Hear Me Now? Good!

It has happened to all of us: you're talking on the phone when you go underground to the Copley T station and the call gets dropped, or you're trying to send a friend a very important text message while on the Green Line when you realize you don't have any service. Those few moments when you're disconnected and isolated from civilization are excruciatingly frustrating. But there's good news! The Boston Globe has just reported that by the end of the year, the MBTA's Green and Blue lines will feature cell phone service. Underground cell service is already available on the entire Orange line and part of the Red line, so it was only natural that passengers on the Blue and Green lines would someday be able to gab on the phone while riding the T too. Unfortunately, the Prudential and Symphony stations on the Green line's E branch will not be getting cell reception until the end of 2012, along with the still unserviced areas of the Red line. However, installation of cell reception on the rest of the Green line and all of the Blue line should be completed by the end of 2011. All of the MBTA's 35 underground stations and 19 miles of tunnels are expected to feature cell phone service by the end of 2012. So Blue and Green line riders, get ready to talk, text, and check email while riding the T. You can even use the new cell service to Text a Librarian and get help from a librarian at Snell! But please, be courteous while talking on your cell phones. Just because nothing will be stopping you from chatting obnoxiously loud to your friend on your phone about what you did last weekend doesn't mean you should do it. If you are respectful of others around you while using your phone, riding the T can be a pleasant experience for all. To find out more read the Boston Globe article and for research and books about the history of the MBTA, search NUCat, Northeastern's library catalog.

Extended back files of Web of Science now available

An article on a revision of the US Government’s socio-economic index, published in 1982 in the journal, Social Science Research, has been cited by other articles in a broad array of academic journals over 300 times, with the most recent citation being from an article published in June 2011. By extending our offering of Web of Science back files from 1975 through 1992, we are able to provide Northeastern researchers with these historical statistics, allowing them to identify the most important articles, journals, institutions, and authors in their field or subject area of study. When viewing any article in the Web of Science database, a list of citations from that article are provided as well as a list of other subsequent articles and conference proceedings that cite the original article. Links connect to the full text of the cited articles when the full text is available. And don’t be fooled by the title of this database.  As the above example illustrates, Web of Science covers scholarly articles in all types of sciences that include journals in the humanities and social sciences. Visit our News & Events page to read more about this collection or visit our full listing of online databases and trials.