2017

Design for Diversity Opening Forum: A Reflection

To read the full reflection, visit the Digital Scholarship Group's news page. Design for Diversity is an IMLS grant-funded national forum project based out of the Digital Scholarship Group. The goal of the project centers around creating a collaborative Teaching and Learning Toolkit for practioners who are interested in designing and working with information systems that can represent diverse ways of knowing. The Design for Diversity Opening Forum – the first event – was held at Northeastern on October 16 and 17 to begin the collaborative process of building the toolkit. This two-day event consisted of case study presentations to inspire both larger and smaller group discussions as well as collaborative group note-taking; the Design for Diversity team has made available several of the slides from the presentations (available on links the schedule) and recordings of the presentations. These case study examples ranged from how to work with historically disenfranchised communities and their cultural materials, to how metadata can be exclusive or uncover previously hidden relationships and networks, and to how the constraints of digital tools and platforms’ might help or hinder identity representation. One of the most common questions during the event was how academics– who are situated in an institution that can continue to perpetuate the oppression of historically disenfranchised communities –can not only work with, but work for these communities. Another common theme that came up during the event was how well-designed workflows can center around this work. What are the methodologies that will lead to a successful, ethical, and healthy project ecology that will set up for the success of the project and those invested? All projects have constraints and recognizing them is an important step to acknowledging what a project can do. Designing a healthy project ecology also means understanding the affordances and limitations of individual tools and technologies. Using the examples provided at the Opening Forum and other places where these conversations are happening, information system practioners can continue to come together and share how we shape learning environments to foster conversations about justice, dismantling hierarchies, and making spaces for a multitude of ways of being and knowledges. If you would like to know more about Design for Diversity, there are several ways to participate in the project. You can also sign up for the Design for Diversity e-mail list or follow us on Twitter.

Supporting Northeastern’s Global Community

Happy National Distance Learning Week! Snell Library is committed to serving all Huskies—all over the globe. Here are some of the resources and services available for our online and distance students, faculty, and staff: -One-on-one research assistance: Did you know you can schedule an individual consultation with a subject specialist? Find your librarian and schedule an appointment online, or contact your subject librarian directly to ask about meeting options. -24/7 research support: the library offers an online chat service, available 24/7, that connects you to librarians from Northeastern and other academic libraries. You can get your research questions answered at any time of the day or night. -Research tutorials: Check out the library’s online research tutorials for help getting started with a research topic, developing keywords, or locating peer-reviewed sources -Interlibrary loan: Found an article you need, but can’t access the full text? Place a request through Illiad, the library’s interlibrary loan service. This service is free to use, and it typically only takes 1-2 business days to fill article requests. You’ll receive an email when your PDF is ready. -Local library access: Through a partnership with OCLC Shares, Snell Library is able to offer on-site access to a group of academic libraries worldwide. Want to see if there’s one near you? Check out the list of participating institutions

Why You Should Start Using Citation Management Software

Would you like to learn how to create a bibliography or "works cited" page in a matter of seconds? Are you wondering how best to keep track of all the citations you copy and paste for all the articles and books you use? Do you wish you could just plug in a footnote while you're writing in Word or Google Docs, and have it automatically format correctly? Are you interested in finding ways to store (and maybe even share) the citations and documents you're accumulating in your research? Citation management software allows you accomplish all these things!
  • download citations (and attach PDFs) from various websites and databases,
  • store the citations in folders, and optionally share them,
  • create properly formatted footnotes, endnotes, and bibliographies using APA, ASCE, Chicago, MLA, and dozens of other styles painlessly in your word processor.
There are many commercial products out there for you to choose from, but at Northeastern we support Endnote, Refworks, and Zotero. Next week, the library offers several workshops and a drop in session to help you get started and answer questions.  Choose the right software for your needs, install or register your account, learn how to upload citations, and "cite while you write" in Word and Google Docs.           Workshop dates and times Getting Started with Endnote Monday, October 30 10:30-11:15 422 Snell Library Register Getting Started with Zotero Tuesday, October 31 9:15-10:00 422 Snell Library Register Getting Started with Refworks Wednesday, November 1 9:15-10:00 422 Snell Library Register Getting Started with Refworks (ONLINE) Thursday, November 2 noon-12:45 Register DROP IN Citation Help Friday, November 3 9:30-11:30 CoLab D, Level 1 Snell Library (near Argo Tea) (no registration necessary) Please join us!

Open Access Week is 10 Years Old!

The theme of this year's International Open Access Week, "Open in order to...", highlights the multitude of reasons why Open Access is important to researchers, students, funders, patients, and everyone else who benefits from increased sharing of knowledge. This year marks the 10th celebration of International Open Access Week, held during the last full week of October to advocate for fewer barriers between people and the information they need. At Snell Library, we support Open Access in lots of ways. In 2016, our staff adopted an open access policy for our published research and presentations - you can find them in our Digital Repository Service. These materials have been viewed almost 2,000 times and have been downloaded by readers more than 1,000 times! If you're a researcher at Northeastern and would like to get started using the DRS to make your work more accessible to readers around the world, it's easy. Also of interest to researchers: we've recently updated the page on our website about Open Access, and it now includes a list of publishers that offer Northeastern-affiliated authors a discount on the article processing charges for publishing open-access with them. Snell Library also supports Open Access journal publishing on campus through Open Journal Systems (OJS). We currently work with four journals being published at Northeastern - including NU Writing, which recently moved over to our OJS system from the platform it was previously using. NU Writing just released their first issue using OJS! And, we support Open Access publishing and sharing through our memberships in initiatives such as the Digital Commonwealth, the Digital Public Library of AmericaHathiTrustKnowledge Unlatched, and SCOAP³. In October 2008, we celebrated the first international Open Access Day at Snell Library. Since then, as the Open Access movement has grown, we’ve expanded our programming as well – first, with Open Access Week, and then in the past two years with Open Access Month in October. This year, we’re expanding the concept even more – we want to highlight openness in research, teaching, scholarship, and creativity throughout the academic year. After all, at this point, open access is something that we should be acknowledging as an established facet of the scholarly ecosystem, rather than a special topic that only gets attention once a year. So, stay tuned for open access–related news and events to come. Banner image and poster openly licensed by SPARC, CC BY 4.0

Now’s Your Chance to Meet the Press!

[caption id="attachment_274119" align="alignright" width="300"]Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them. September 16, 1956: Eleanor Roosevelt is seated at a table on the Meet the Press set in New York City. She is smiling at a man standing behind her. Host Ned Brooks is seated next to them.[/caption]Meet the Press has been on television longer than any other program in history. The show premiered in 1947, and it’s been a cornerstone of the American cultural and political landscape ever since. It’s the first show to ever conduct a live interview via satellite (in 1965, with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson) and the first live network news show to ever host a sitting president (Gerald Ford, in 1975). Since Ford, every American president has dropped by Meet the Press at least once. Now, all of this history, much of which has been unseen since its original television broadcast, is just a few clicks away. Over the summer, Snell Library acquired access to the full surviving run of Meet the Press, from 1947 to today, through Alexander Street Press. That’s almost 1500 hours—or 62.5 days—of video available to you for free, dating back to 1957. You can watch Eleanor Roosevelt talk politics in the 1950s; see Martin Luther King, Jr. discuss the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s; hear Dan Rostenkowski describe Reaganomics in the 1980s; or watch Ross Perot’s presidential campaign unfold in the 1990s. Many episodes include detailed transcripts and closed captioning. Meet the Press is available from our A-Z Databases list. You can also click here for direct access. If you are off campus, you may be asked to sign in with your NEU ID and password.