February Exhibits @ Snell Library

NU Student Groups on Campus Have you been thinking about joining a NU student group? Snell Library is highlighting student groups on campus and the contributions they make to the Northeastern community. Take a look at the groups that have exhibited. You might find something to spark your interest!
  • Campus Girl Scouts
  • NU Barkada
  • Spectrum Literary Arts Magazine
  • Distilled Harmony
  • Sigma Delta Tau
  • Nor’easters A Capella
The exhibit will be up through the month of February in the foyer of Snell Library, so come and check it out. Also in the library exhibit case is an exhibit celebrating Black History month. This exhibit, put together by Kantigi Camara, Head Librarian, O’Bryant African American Institute Library, celebrates the lives of African American men and women who have made an impact on American life and culture. Come and check out the posters and statues. It is a great visual exhibit!

Authors Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein at the Library

Authors of Aristotle and an Aardvark Go to Washington: Understanding Political Doublespeak through Philosophy and Jokes, Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein will be speaking in 421 Snell Library on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 @ Noon as part of the Meet the Author series.

The Family Fortune

Keeping up with my Austen kick, another slightly chick lit adaptation that I read recently (this fall) was The Family Fortune by Laurie Horowitz.  This modernizing update of Persuasion was recommended to me by a friend.  Even though I’m well familiar with the story, I still found myself dying to get back to reading it.  Somehow, these stories still manage to generate in me a page-turning suspense.

I thought certain aspects of this update worked better than others.  Jane Fortune, the Anne Eliot stand-in works for her family’s literary journal, the Euphemia Review.  While in keeping with Jane’s literary interests (and the opportunity for meeting her Captain Wentworth figure, writer Max Wellman), something about the unrealistic nature of her career bothered me.  The story is set in Boston, which makes it a fun read. 

While no Austen, and at times oddly irksome, I still found myself captivated by The Family Fortune.  What do you think of the cottage industry of chick lit ‘Austen’ retreads?  Do you have a book that fully captured your interest despite its faults?

Duma Key

Has anyone had the opportunity to read the latest from Stephen King?  We got a copy from the public library and unfortunately only had 7 days so Joel tried and got bored after about 100 pages.  I actually made it past 100 pages and wanted to keep going but we were good library patrons and returned it on time.  OK so maybe it was a little late.  But I’d be interested to hear if anyone made it to the end and if it’s worth getting back on the waiting list for it.